Communications should be… Pt. 1

Posted by Kimberley Drobny, Vice President, Marketing

March 4, 2016; 3:30 PM

Simple

 

The business communication market has become flooded with a wide selection of products offering a multitude of different features — some of which are actually helpful to users while others are merely superfluous gimmicks. However, when it gets right down to it, business owners all need their phone system to do one thing above all else:

 

More than anything, they need it to work and to work well.

 

But how can having too many features be considered a bad thing?

 

The pitfalls of having too many features

 

One of the last things users want from their phones is a steep learning curve. Having to learn the proper way to use so many features can be difficult for users and can lengthen the amount of time it takes for a full implementation. Plus the more “moving parts” that come with a product results in a higher potential for things to break down, which can lead to employees becoming irritated.

 

When employees find it difficult to use certain aspects of their phone or when an essential component fails, they begin to resist adopting the new system. Once the sheen of their new tool has worn off the user is only concerned with whether or not it will enhance their productivity or if it will slow them down.

 

As users begin resisting adopting the new system, companies may find themselves paying for services that aren’t being used. Business owners often experience buyer’s remorse once they realize a majority of the features they’ve paid for remain dormant and unused.

 

Lastly, providers can sometimes become so focused on developing new features that they’re unable to provide much support. When introducing more and more new features takes precedence over supporting existing products, buyers are likely going to experience headaches later on.

 

What does “simple” mean?

 

There are three primary characteristics of simplicity that make such a product superior over its feature-rich counterparts. They are:

 

  1. Easy – A product or service that’s simple is easy to use because there are fewer hurdles to overcome and the learning curve isn’t as demanding, allowing users to go about their day-to-day business without interference.
  2. Intuitive – Another attribute of simplicity is the capacity for the user to inherently understand how to use the product and incorporate it into their toolbox intuitively.
  3. Alluring – By implementing a simple yet powerful new system, users will want to adopt the new phones without any prompting required.

The benefits of simplicity

 

The benefits of simple business communication systems greatly outweigh those of feature-heavy services. For one, a powerful yet simple VoIP system can help businesses save time. Less time will need to be spent training employees on how to use the new system, allowing them to get back to business quickly with minimal downtime.

 

It can also enhance the user’s productivity. Focusing less on features and more on providing high-quality service, a powerful product and excellent support results in users experiencing the positive ways the new system augments their work immediately.

 

Not only that, but a simple new system is more likely to be adopted by users than one that’s complicated and difficult to use. While employees are typically always open to new tools that will help with their productivity, when those tools are complicated they can become frustrated. Simplicity avoids the complication and gives users exactly what they’re looking for.

 

A provider who puts all of their focus on supplying the highest-quality product and level of service instills within their partners an unprecedented level of confidence that they’ll never have to undergo significant downtime or outages. ESI excels in the VoIP and UC market by providing a product and service that’s simply powerful.

The business communication market has become flooded with a wide selection of products offering a multitude of different features — some of which are actually helpful to users while others are merely superfluous gimmicks. However, when it gets right down to it, business owners all need their phone system to do one thing above all else:

Topics: mobility